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Social Media for Brands: Facebook Changes in Organic Reach

If you run a Facebook business page for your brand or for your clients, you may have noticed that your posts are being seen by fewer and fewer people over recent months. You’re not imagining things. Facebook has indeed decreased the organic reach of posts from pages, in an effort to entice businesses to pay for advertising to get their content seen. Rumor has it that this decline is going to continue – maybe even as low as 1-2% average organic reach for any given post. Needless to say, this is discouraging news for companies that have invested time and

FacebookChangesinOrganicReach

If you run a Facebook business page for your brand or for your clients, you may have noticed that your posts are being seen by fewer and fewer people over recent months. You’re not imagining things. Facebook has indeed decreased the organic reach of posts from pages, in an effort to entice businesses to pay for advertising to get their content seen. Rumor has it that this decline is going to continue – maybe even as low as 1-2% average organic reach for any given post.

Needless to say, this is discouraging news for companies that have invested time and effort into building an engaged following on Facebook. One company even made headlines recently for publicly “breaking up” with Facebook over the changes.

So … Now What?

So what are businesses and brands supposed to do? Here are some of the questions we are hearing from our clients, and that you may be asking as well:

  • Should my company keep using Facebook?
  • Should we pay to advertise on Facebook?
  • How should we adjust our overall social media strategy?

Don’t Freak Out: We Never Owned Facebook in the First Place.

FacebookChangesinOrganicReachAn important thing to keep in mind is who actually owns your page on any given social network (hint: it’s not you), and to accept the fact that these sorts of changes will happen as social media brands look for ways to increase their own revenues. In today’s video, I address the above questions and share some recommendations for how to adjust your social strategy in light of these changes, including:

  • What to do if you’re not interested/willing to pay for Facebook ads right now?
  • Whether to continue posting content on Facebook, and how often
  • Other social networks to consider investing more time in
  • Directing followers to content that you DO own

Remember that while the changes from Facebook may be frustrating, all companies and small businesses are in the same boat. Roll with the punches, adjust your sails as needed, and focus your social media efforts on the areas where you are most likely to connect with your target audience.

Have you changed your social media strategy in light of the Facebook changes? Share your thoughts below or connect with us on Facebook Twitter or LinkedIn.

 

Kate Finley

Founder + CEO of Belle
Currently thriving in Puerto Rico